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Tim Cook meets the people who assemble Apple’s iPhone in latest trip

Tim Cook meets the people who assemble his company's iPhone in latest trip

Tim Cook made a quick stop at a Foxconn factory in China, getting to see the iPhone 6 assembled himself. Calling it an early highlight of his China trip, Cook even posed for a photo with a worker and posted it to Twitter. The Apple CEO will also be meeting with the Vice Premier of China as part of the trip.

What do you think of Cook’s efforts to get to know the workers of Foxconn?

Source: Twitter

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iFixit finds smaller battery, reworked internals in iPad Air 2 teardown

ifixit air 2

As the new iPads begin arriving in stores and on doorsteps, iFixit has gotten its hands on an iPad Air 2 and performed its usual teardown ritual. Upon popping the tablet open, the team discovered a more powerful processor, 2GB of RAM, and a smaller battery.

The processor is of course the new A8X, which is similar to the A8 in the iPhone 6 but with improved graphics. The RAM is comprised of two 1GB Elpida F8164A3MD sticks placed on either side of the A8X, and the battery is of the 27.62 Whr; 7,340 mAh variety.

ifixit air 1

It’s worth noting that it’s smaller than the battery in the first generation Air, which was rated a 8,827 mAh/32.9 Whr. The change obviously had to do with Apple’s effort to try and thin out the new tablet, and some reviewers pointed out the drop in battery life.

Also interesting is that there’s an NFC module in the Air 2—the same NXP 65V10 model found in the new iPhones. It however does not appear to have an antenna, which is why Apple says the tablet won’t be capable of making in-store purchases via Apple Pay.

ifixit air 3

If you’re interested in learning more, you can find a full breakdown of the iPad Air 2’s internals here. Also remember that both the Air 2 and iPad mini 3 are now available for order online and in-store pickup (Wi-Fi only) with prices starting at $399 and $499.

[iFixit]

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Ford Museum snags Woz-built Apple-1 for $905,000 at auction

Ford Museum snags Apple-1 for $905,000 at auction

While us peasants are busy snatching up Apple’s latest offerings this week, The Henry Ford museum is busy snagging a piece of Apple history. Going for $905,000 at auction, an Apple-1 hand-built by Steve Wozniak, was sold to the museum today.

The machine was initially expected to sell for between $300,000 and $500,000, but the final bid clearly blew those expectations out of the water.

Ford Museum snags Woz-built Apple-1 for $905,000 at auction

There’s no doubt that this is a monumental piece of history, as the Apple-1 was arguably what started the world of computing on its path to ubiquity. Therefore, it is both fitting and reassuring that the machine will rest in the halls of the Henry Ford Museum for all to see.

What do you think of this piece going for such a high price? Will you be checking it out on a future trip to the museum?

Source: Fortune

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Which iPad should you get?

Apple’s 2014 iPad lineup is jam-packed. At the top end there’s the brand new iPad Air 2. Then there’s the updated iPad mini 3, last year’s iPad Air and last year’s iPad mini 2, and at the lower-than-ever bottom end, the original iPad mini. There are different features, different screen sizes, different capacities, and different price points to consider. In other words, there’s a lot to choose from. So do you go with big or small, old or new, cost or value? Which iPad should you get?

iPad models and price points

Apple’s spring 2014 iPad lineup consists of 4 different models, the iPad Air, Retina iPad mini, iPad 4, and iPad mini. The iPad Air and Retina iPad mini have 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB storage options, in either Wi-Fi only, or Wi-Fi and cellular models. The iPad 4 and iPad mini come only with 16GB, but still have Wi-Fi only, or Wi-Fi + cellular models. That makes for a dizzying array of possibilities.

Yes, both the new Retina iPad mini and the old iPad 4 start at $399.

iPad Specs

iPad mini iPad Air iPad mini 2 iPad mini 3 iPad Air 2
iPad mini iPad Air iPad mini Retina iPad mini 3 iPad Air 2
Screen Size 7.9 inches 9.7 inches 7.9 inches 7.9 inches 9.7 inches
Screen Resolution 1024×768 (163ppi) 2048×1536 (264ppi) 2048×1536 (264ppi) 2048×1536 (326ppi) 2048×1536 (326ppi) | | 2048×1536 (264ppi)
Screen Type IPS LED IPS LED IPS LED IPS LED Laminated IPS LED
System-on-a-chip Apple A5 Apple A7 Apple A7 Apple A7 Apple A8X
CPU 1GHz dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 64-bit dual core Apple A7 Cyclone (ARM v8) 64-bit dual core Apple A7 Cyclone (ARM v8) 64-bit dual core Apple A7 Cyclone (ARM v8) 64-bit triple core Apple A7 Cyclone 2 (ARM v8)
GPU PowerVR dual-core SGX543MP4 PowerVR quad-core SGX554MP4 PowerVR G6430 PowerVR G6430 PowerVR G6430 | PowerVR GX6650?
Co-processor none M7 Motion M7 Motion M7 Motion M8 Motion
RAM 512MB 1GB 1GB 1GB 2GB
Storage 16GB 16GB/32GB 16GB/32GB 16GB/64GB/128GB 16GB/64GB/128GB
Cellular Data LTE LTE LTE LTE LTE Advanced
SIM Nano Nano Nano Nano Apple
Rear Camera 5MP/1080p 5MP/1080p 5MP/1080p 5MP/1080P 8MP/1080P
Front Camera 1.2MP/720p 1.2MP/720p 1.2MP/720p 1.2MP/720p 1.2MP/720p
Bluetooth Bluetooth 4.0 Bluetooth 4.0 Bluetooth 4.0 Bluetooth 4.0 Bluetooth 4.0
Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n 802.11a/b/g/n MIMO 802.11a/b/g/n MIMO 802.11a/b/g/n MIMO 802.11a/b/g/n/ac MIMO
GPS aGPS, GLONASS aGPS, GLONASS aGPS, GLONASS aGPS, GLONASS aGPS, GLONASS
Sensors Ambient light, accelerometer, compass, gyroscope Ambient light, accelerometer, compass, gyroscope Ambient light, accelerometer, compass, gyroscope Ambient light, accelerometer, compass, gyroscope Ambient light, accelerometer, compass, gyroscope, barometer
Speakers Stereo Stereo Stereo Stereo Stereo
Connector Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning
Height 7.87 inches (199.9 mm) 9.4 inches (238.8 mm) 7.87 inches (199.9 mm) 7.87 inches (199.9 mm) 9.4 inches (238.8 mm)
Width 5.3 inches (134.6 mm) 6.6 inches (167.6 mm) 5.3 inches (134.6 mm) 5.3 inches (134.6 mm) 6.6 inches (167.6 mm)
Depth 0.28 inches (7.1 mm) 0.29 inches (7.4 mm) 0.29 inches (7.4 mm) 0.29 inches (7.4 mm) 0.24 inches (6.1 mm)
Weight 0.68 lbs (308 g) 1.0 lbs (454 g) 0.73 lbs (331 g) 0.73 lbs (331 g) 0.96 lbs (437 g)
Battery 4440mAh 8820mAh 6471mAh 6471mAh 6471mAh | N/A
Colors Black/White Space gray/Silver Space gray/Silver Space gray/Silver/Gold Space gray/Silver/Gold

Up-front vs. total cost of ownership

The original iPad mini now starts at $249, making it the cheapest iPad ever. The iPad mini 2 starts at $299. Both cost less up-front than the new iPad mini 3 or the original iPad Air, which start at $399, and the new iPad Air 2 which starts at $499. That can be a considerable difference up front, $100 to $250 depending on the exact model and options you choose. That’s real money, in your pocket, for rent, for food, for car payments, for school, or for other important things in your life.

However, if you keep an iPad over the course of a year or two, $100 or even $250 isn’t that much spread out over time. In some cases, it’s less than $10 a month, for a much better screen, a much better processor, and more. The longer you keep it, the greater the cost gets spread over time.

If you have absolutely no money to work with, the iPad mini is an okay tablet and the iPad mini 2 and iPad Air are very good ones. If money isn’t your biggest consideration, the iPad mini 3 and especially the iPad Air 2 will serve you much better for much longer.

Finite vs. future-proof

Apple is pretty good about supporting older devices. They supported the spring 2011 iPad 2 until spring 2014. They’re still supporting the 2012 iPad mini. That’s an eternity in gadget years. However, compatibility comes with compromise. Older generation iPads have older generation hardware. the original iPad mini has a lower screen density — standard instead of Retina — and older processors — 32-bit Apple A5 instead of 64-bit Apple A8. It also doesn’t come with any storage options over 16GB — not even 32GB. If you plan on doing almost anything of substance with your iPad, you’ll want more.

Also, while the iPad mini was updated to iOS 8 this year, there’s no guarantee it will get iOS 9 next year, or iOS 10 the year after.

Conversely, the iPad mini 2 and original iPad Air have Retina displays, beefy Apple A7 processors, and storage options up to 32GB.

The iPad mini 3 has the same display and processor, but storage options up to 128GB.

At the very top, the iPad Air 2 has a laminated display, Apple A8X, and storage options up to 128GB which should last you for years to come.

Screen size vs. display density

Both the iPad Air and iPad Air 2 have 9.7-inch displays. The original iPad mini, iPad mini 2, and iPad mini 3 all have 7.9-inch displays. The original iPad mini has a resolution of 1024×768, but all the other iPads have a resolution of 2048×1536.

So, the iPad mini and iPad mini 2 have the densest displays at 326ppi (same as the iPhone 6). That’s because it’s the same resolution as the iPad Airs, but shrunk down to a slightly smaller size. Since you might have to hold it closer, it probably won’t make much real-world difference. On paper, however, it’s on par with the highest density screens Apple makes.

The iPad Air and iPad Air 2 have the next densest display at 264ppi (same as the iPad 4 and iPad 3). That’s because, while they’re the same resolution as the Retina iPad minis, they’re slightly larger. Since you might be able to hold it further away, again, it won’t make that much real-world difference. They also have much higher color gamut than the iPad minis, so reds and purples look deeper and better.

The original iPad mini has a 163ppi screen (the same as the old iPhone 3GS).

What’s more, the iPad Air 2 has a laminated display with a new anti-glare coating. That means pixels don’t look like they’re painted on the back of the glass, but embedded into the glass. That means it works better in the sun than any iPad before it.

If you don’t really care about display size or quality, you’ll be fine with the original iPad mini. If you want a smaller display, but a good one, either the iPad mini 2 or iPad mini 3 will do you well. If you want a bigger display with better color, the iPad Air is for you. If you want a great display, you want the iPad Air 2.

Who should get an original iPad mini?

The iPad mini launched in October of 2012, and comes with a Lightning adapter. Aside from that, it’s all old tech. Standard display instead of Retina, and Apple A5 processor instead of Apple A7. The current version does come with Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi + cellular options, but with only 16GB of storage, which will almost certainly prove painful.

If there’s any way for you to save up an additional $50 for the iPad mini 2, or better still, $150 for the 32GB iPad mini 2, you’ll have a much, much better experience. Otherwise, if you really want an iPad, and you’ve got $249 earmarked for it and not a penny more — or you’re equipping a school or business by the score — get the iPad mini.

It’s just not recommended, especially because of the limited storage.

Who should get an iPad mini 2?

The iPad mini 2 comes packed with 7.9-inches of 2048×1536 Retina display and a fast Apple A7 processor. It’s identical in most ways to the original iPad Air. It’s just $100 cheaper.

If price is a consideration, the iPad mini 2 is a really good tablet, and starts at just $299. If size is a consideration, the iPad mini 2 is better if you want to travel with it, use it as a mobile hotspot, and otherwise value portability the most. (It’ll fit in a baggy back jeans pocket if it has to.) Likewise, if you already travel with a laptop, the iPad mini 2 is a great companion device.

However, it doesn’t have Touch ID or Apple pay, and it doesn’t have the option for 64GB or 128GB of storage.

Who should get an original iPad Air?

The original iPad Air has a 9.7-inch, 2048×1536 Retina display and fast Apple A7 processor. Aside from size, weight, display quality, and price, however, it’s pretty much identical to the iPad mini 2. So, if you’re looking for a mid-range iPad, your choice boils down to an extra $100 for an extra 2-inches. That means it starts at just $399.

If size is something you’re debating, the iPad Air is primed for people who use it around the house, office, or school, and otherwise put productively ahead of portability. (Those extra inches can come in handy.) Likewise, if you don’t travel with a laptop, the the larger real-estate and keyboard size can make the iPad Air a much better replacement device.

However, it doesn’t have Touch ID or Apple pay, or the new Apple A8X processor, and it doesn’t have the option for 64GB or 128GB of storage.

Who should get an iPad mini 3?

The iPad mini 3 comes packed with the same 7.9-inches of 2048×1536 Retina display and a fast Apple A7 processor as the iPad mini 2. The big differences are Touch ID, Apple Pay, and the option for 64GB or 128GB of storage. All starting at $399.

Touch ID and Apple Pay might seem like conveniences, but they can also be transformative. If you enter a lot of passwords on your iPad, or do a lot shopping, an extra $100 over the course of a year or two (or more) may not be that much money. Likewise, if you want to store a ton of media, apps, or other content on your iPad, the higher capacity models may be more of a must-have than nice-to-have.

If size is a consideration, the iPad mini 2 is better if you want to travel with it, use it as a mobile hotspot, and otherwise value portability the most. (It’ll fit in a baggy back jeans pocket if it has to.) Likewise, if you already travel with a laptop, the iPad mini 3 is a great companion device.

The iPad mini 3 — and Touch ID + Apple Pay — only look expensive because Apple cut the iPad mini 2 by $100 instead of $50. If you have the extra money, though, the value can still exceed the cost.

Who should get an iPad Air 2?

The iPad Air 2 has the same 9.7-inch, 2048×1536 Retina display as the original iPad Air, but laminated now, and with an anti-glare coating to make it look better and work better in a wider range of conditions. It also has the tri-core Apple A8X processor which, combined with Apple’s frameworks, can enable performance on-par with recent ultrabooks. All in a thin sliver of glass you can hold in your hands. Starting at $499.

You’ve also go Touch ID and Apple Pay, and 64GB and 128GB storage options. Touch ID and Apple Pay might seem like conveniences, but they can also be transformative. If you enter a lot of passwords on your iPad, or do a lot shopping, an extra $100 over the course of a year or two (or more) may not be that much money. Likewise, if you want to store a ton of media, apps, or other content on your iPad, the higher capacity models may be more of a must-have than nice-to-have.

If size is something you’re debating, the iPad Air 2 is primed for people who use it around the house, office, or school, and otherwise put productively ahead of portability. (Those extra inches can come in handy.) Likewise, if you don’t travel with a laptop, the the larger real-estate and keyboard size can make the iPad Air 2 a much better replacement device.

However, it doesn’t have Touch ID or Apple pay, or the new Apple A8X processor, and it doesn’t have the option for 64GB or 128GB of storage.

Still undecided?

If you’re still having trouble choosing between the iPad mini, iPad mini 2, iPad mini 3, iPad Air, or iPad Air 2, jump into our iPad discussion forums and the best community in mobile will happily help you out.

Bottom line, don’t spend money you don’t have, but don’t skimp if you don’t have to. Your iPad will be one of the most often-used, most important possessions in your life for months and maybe years to come. Get as much iPad as you can reasonably afford, and then enjoy!

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How to install Cydia on iOS 8 [video]

Cydia iOS 8

As you know, the Pangu jailbreak came out this morning and enabled the ability to jailbreak iOS 8-8.1. Unfortunately, the jailbreak wasn’t bundled with Cydia, so it’s not much use to the general jailbreak users by itself.

Thankfully, Saurik quickly compiled a working version of Cydia for iOS 8, which is pretty easy to install if you follow our 8 steps. We show you how in this hands-on video walkthrough.

Step 1: Jailbreak iOS 8

No items found.

Step 2: Install OpenSSH on your device from the Pangu app

Step 3: Download and install CyberDuck SFTP client

Step 4: Find your iOS device’s Wi-Fi IP address via Settings → Wi-Fi → ‘i

Step 5: Launch CyberDuck and connect to your iOS device’s IP address

Step 6: Download the needed Cydia files, and place them on your iOS device via CyberDuck

Step 7: While CyberDuck is open, click Go → Send Command and paste the following command and click Send:

dpkg –install cydia-lproj_1.1.12_iphoneos-arm.deb cydia_1.1.13_iphoneos-arm.deb

Step 8: Click GoSend Command again, and type restart and click Send. This will reboot your iOS device.

Upon reboot, you should see the Cydia icon on your Home screen. Launch Cydia to initialize and enjoy your new jailbroken iPhone with Cydia!

What do you think? Did this work for you? How does it feel to have Cydia running on iOS 8.1?

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iPad Air 2 tear down reveals A8X processor, 2 GB RAM, smaller battery

iPad Air 2 tear down reveals A8X processor, 2 GB RAM, smaller battery

Apple’s latest iPad Air 2 has been torn down to reveal the slim tablet’s internals. With Apple shaving 18 percent of the thickness from last year’s iPad Air model, the new Air comes with a smaller battery. Given that the company is still advertising the same 10-hour battery life, Apple has made considerable improvements to the software and other hardware components to make the iPad Air 2 efficient. Along with the slimmer battery, we also see the Apple A8X processor alongside 2 GB of RAM.

Apple claims the same 10-hour battery life as the original Air, so more efficient power use seems to be on tap here—though early reviews seem to indicate that real-world battery life is down a bit from the previous-gen iPad.

Additionally, the iFixIt tear down reveals that there are no external screws to the tablet, so the only way in is to pry open the display. Though the LCD screen is more rigid thanks the the new display tech this year, there is still some risk to damaging the unit if you’re not careful in prying things apart:

The glued-down display remains the iPad’s only access point, so there’s still a risk of damaging it even when performing ordinary repairs.

If you want to play surgery on your tablet, be sure to visit the iFixIt guide.

Have you picked up a new iPad today? Let us know what you think of Apple’s slimmer design, enhanced performance, and battery life on the iPad Air 2.

Source: iFixIt

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Olloclip introduces 4-in-1 camera lens for iPhone 6 and 6 Plus

olloclip iphone 6

Popular mobile device accessory maker Olloclip introduced a new product today for the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. It’s a 4-in-1 photo lens kit, designed exclusively for Apple’s two latest handsets, that includes fisheye, wide-angle, 10x and 15x lenses.

The new Olloclip brings about some new features as well. For the first time ever, all four lenses work with both the iSight and FaceTime cameras, and thanks to a new customizable pendant, it can be clipped to a backpack, lanyard or key ring.

For those unfamiliar with the Olloclip, it’s a unique clip-on lens system for the iPhone and iPad. The accessory installs and uninstalls in seconds, with no need for additional tools, and all the lenses allow for crisp photos in normal and low light.

If you’re interested the new Olloclip for iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, it’s available for pre-order today on the company’s website for $79.99. It’s expected to begin shipping within a few weeks, and should start showing up on store shelves by late November.

[Olloclip]

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AT&T boasts strong growth but misses earnings estimate

AT&T boasts strong growth but misses earnings estimate

AT&T has just shared their earnings report for the third quarter. The company was able to gain two million new customers, but missed their earnings estimate. Shares of AT&T are down in after-hours trading following the earnings report.

Highlights from AT&T’s earnings report:

  • More than 2 million new wireless and wireline high-speed broadband connections added
  • Postpaid net adds of 785,000, more than double the year-ago quarter; more than 2.4 million postpaid net adds year to date
  • Best-ever third-quarter postpaid churn of 0.99 percent
  • Wireless data billings up nearly 24 percent versus the year-earlier quarter
  • Third-quarter consolidated revenues of $33.0 billion, up 2.5 percent versus the year-earlier period

Source: AT&T

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How to jailbreak iOS 8.1 with Pangu 1.0.1 [video]

Pwned

Pangu for iOS 8 caught us all by surprise, but it shouldn’t be a shock that the talented Chinese jailbreak team pulled off a jailbreak in such a short period of time since iOS 8’s release. While the Pangu tool for iOS 8 isn’t exactly ideal as far as a consumer jailbreak goes—it doesn’t come bundled with Cydia, it’s in Chinese, and it’s Windows only—it’s certainly better than nothing.

In this video tutorial, we will show you how to jailbreak iOS 8.1 using Pangu 1.0.1 with a Windows machine. It’s an extremely easy and simple process, as long as you follow the steps exactly. This tool can jailbreak the iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, and any other device capable of running iOS 8.x. Check out our full video tutorial for the details.

Note, this jailbreak does not install Cydia yet. Check back for the Cydia tutorial.

Step 1: Perform a fresh restore of iOS 8.1 on your device with iTunes

Step 2: On your iOS device go to Settings → iCloud → Find My iPhone, and disable Find My iPhone

Step 3: On your iOS device Go to Settings → Passcode, and disable the Passcode Lock

Step 4: Install iTunes on your Windows machine, and ensure that iTunes recognizes your iOS device when you connect it to your computer. This is vital.

Step 5: Download the Pangu tool from our downloads page and save it to your desktop

Step 6: Right click on the Pangu tool, and select Run as administrator → Yes

Step 7: Uncheck the box on the Pangu tool to prevent necessary software from installing on your iOS device

Step 8: Wait until the Pangu tool recognizes your connected iOS device and click the blue jailbreak button

Step 9: Be patient as the jailbreak process completes, and then launch the Pangu app on your iPhone

Step 10: Check back for our Cydia installation tutorial to install Cydia and download tweaks and apps

If you follow these steps to a tee, you should have no problem jailbreaking your iOS 8.1 device. Yes, this even works with the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

Did it work for you? Sound off in the comments below with your questions, thoughts, and opinions.

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Apple Pay glitch causing some Bank of America users to be double charged

Passbook Apple Pay 8 Limit

There is a glitch in Apple Pay that is causing some Bank of America customers to be charged twice for purchases, reports Bloomberg. A number of BOA card holders have come forward saying that they are seeing duplicate charges on their statements for Apple Pay-related transactions.

While some teething issues are expected with any new service launch—particularly on Apple Pay’s—this has proven to be a serious problem. Customers affected by the glitch found themselves stuck between Apple and Bank of America customer service, with both sides passing the buck.

After seeing the incorrect charges, many customers instinctively called Bank of America in search of a refund, only to be referred back to Apple. Apple, however, was quick to remind them that the reason Apple Pay is so safe is because they don’t handle any bank or credit card information.

Apple’s Trudy Miller confirmed the company is aware of the Bank of America issue that’s affecting a small number of users. And a Bank of America spokesperson added: “We do apologize for the inconvenience and are correcting this issue immediately and all duplicates will be refunded.”

After being unveiled last month, Apple Pay officially launched on Monday, and Apple says it’s off to an “amazing” start. The service, which allows iPhone 6 and 6 Plus owners to pay for things online and in stores using their handsets, is supported by several financial institutions and retailers.

[Bloomberg]

Update: Recode shines some additional light on the situation, saying that the issue was between Bank of America and at least one payment network (did not involve Apple), and affected around 1,000 transactions. The bank hopes to have a fix in place today.

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